Ben Matthews, a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University, allows Aedes aegypti mosquitos to bite him, because they needed to feed in order to lay eggs, in New York, Feb. 11, 2016. The DNA from the mosquito’s offspring are being used to create a new genome map. With the Zika virus spreading by mosquito bite, researchers say the genome map will help them fight the disease.
Ben Matthews, a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University, allows Aedes aegypti mosquitos to bite him, because they needed to feed in order to lay eggs, in New York, Feb. 11, 2016. The DNA from the mosquito’s offspring are being used to create a new genome map. With the Zika virus spreading by mosquito bite, researchers say the genome map will help them fight the disease. HILARY SWIFT The New York Times
Ben Matthews, a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University, allows Aedes aegypti mosquitos to bite him, because they needed to feed in order to lay eggs, in New York, Feb. 11, 2016. The DNA from the mosquito’s offspring are being used to create a new genome map. With the Zika virus spreading by mosquito bite, researchers say the genome map will help them fight the disease. HILARY SWIFT The New York Times

Mapping a genetic strategy to fight the Zika virus

March 31, 2016 09:29 PM