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  • Revisiting a WWII internment camp, to keep its story from fading

    Bob Fuchigami was 12 years old when he was sent to the Amache internment camp in Colorado. In 1942, just after the attack on Pearl Harbor, roughly 120,000 people of Japanese descent were evicted from their homes and sent to live in camps around the country. About two-thirds of them were U.S. citizens. At the time, the federal government called the move necessary to protect the West Coast from sabotage.

Revisiting a WWII internment camp, to keep its story from fading

Bob Fuchigami was 12 years old when he was sent to the Amache internment camp in Colorado. In 1942, just after the attack on Pearl Harbor, roughly 120,000 people of Japanese descent were evicted from their homes and sent to live in camps around the country. About two-thirds of them were U.S. citizens. At the time, the federal government called the move necessary to protect the West Coast from sabotage.
The New York Times