Laurie Niewolny, state Fish and Wildlife biologist, and Tim Jones, manager at Penn Cove Shellfish, prepared Penn Cove mussels for a pilot project two years ago that looked at what contaminants were flowing from the land into Puget Sound with stormwater runoff. Another round of monitoring using mussels is starting this October 2015.
Laurie Niewolny, state Fish and Wildlife biologist, and Tim Jones, manager at Penn Cove Shellfish, prepared Penn Cove mussels for a pilot project two years ago that looked at what contaminants were flowing from the land into Puget Sound with stormwater runoff. Another round of monitoring using mussels is starting this October 2015. Jennifer Lanksbury Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald
Laurie Niewolny, state Fish and Wildlife biologist, and Tim Jones, manager at Penn Cove Shellfish, prepared Penn Cove mussels for a pilot project two years ago that looked at what contaminants were flowing from the land into Puget Sound with stormwater runoff. Another round of monitoring using mussels is starting this October 2015. Jennifer Lanksbury Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

Penn Cove mussels to help track pollution flowing into Puget Sound

October 17, 2015 10:10 PM

UPDATED October 20, 2015 02:12 PM

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