Charley, or Charlie, Ah Fat is believed to be perhaps the only Chinese immigrant who wasn't pushed out of Whatcom County when anti-Chinese activities were whipped up by the publishers of the Whatcom Reveille newspaper in the late 19th century. Civic leaders demanded that all Chinese leave the area by Nov. 1, 1885, and researchers found that they weren't allowed to return until the late 1890s for seasonal work in the canneries. 
This photo shows Ah Fat seated in his garden in front of his house, likely  between 1911 to 1913. He died in 1915  and lived in his house at Lighthouse Reserve, now known as Lighthouse Park, from 1893 until his death. He is listed as one of 42 squatters in the 1904 Ellet report, which was a form of inventory of early settlers. He was the only Chinese listed in the Ellet report.
Charley, or Charlie, Ah Fat is believed to be perhaps the only Chinese immigrant who wasn't pushed out of Whatcom County when anti-Chinese activities were whipped up by the publishers of the Whatcom Reveille newspaper in the late 19th century. Civic leaders demanded that all Chinese leave the area by Nov. 1, 1885, and researchers found that they weren't allowed to return until the late 1890s for seasonal work in the canneries. This photo shows Ah Fat seated in his garden in front of his house, likely between 1911 to 1913. He died in 1915 and lived in his house at Lighthouse Reserve, now known as Lighthouse Park, from 1893 until his death. He is listed as one of 42 squatters in the 1904 Ellet report, which was a form of inventory of early settlers. He was the only Chinese listed in the Ellet report. POINT ROBERTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Charley, or Charlie, Ah Fat is believed to be perhaps the only Chinese immigrant who wasn't pushed out of Whatcom County when anti-Chinese activities were whipped up by the publishers of the Whatcom Reveille newspaper in the late 19th century. Civic leaders demanded that all Chinese leave the area by Nov. 1, 1885, and researchers found that they weren't allowed to return until the late 1890s for seasonal work in the canneries. This photo shows Ah Fat seated in his garden in front of his house, likely between 1911 to 1913. He died in 1915 and lived in his house at Lighthouse Reserve, now known as Lighthouse Park, from 1893 until his death. He is listed as one of 42 squatters in the 1904 Ellet report, which was a form of inventory of early settlers. He was the only Chinese listed in the Ellet report. POINT ROBERTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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Project reflects on expulsion of Chinese from Whatcom County 125 years ago

November 07, 2010 3:01 AM

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