Seattle Seahawks

Seahawks’ Brandon Browner investigated in California for alleged battery

Brandon Browner works out with the Seattle Seahawks during organized team activities (OTA) on June 1 at the Virginia Mason Athletic Center.
Brandon Browner works out with the Seattle Seahawks during organized team activities (OTA) on June 1 at the Virginia Mason Athletic Center. dkoepfler@thenewstribune.com

Police in Pomona are investigating whether to charge Seahawks defensive back Brandon Browner with battery following an incident at Browner’s home in that Southern California city Tuesday night involving the father-in-law of Browner’s girlfriend.

But a Pomona watch commander told The News Tribune his department’s officers do not believe Browner broke the father-in-law’s thumb in a driveway altercation, as has been widely reported.

Pomona Police Lieutenant Ron McDonald told me Wednesday morning on the telephone “there’s a lot of misinformation out there.” He said police investigators trying to determine whether to charge Browner over the incident Tuesday at 8 p.m. in Browner’s driveway have “no medical evidence” the Seahawk broke the man’s thumb.

“He refused medical treatment at the scene,” Lt. McDonald said of the girlfriend’s father-in-law. “He fell down and then said he felt pain in his thumb.”

The watch commander said Browner and his girlfriend’s father-in-law live within walking distance from each other in Pomona. Police believe the incident started as a heated telephone conversation between the two men, then escalated after the father-in-law walked to Browner’s home. “They met in the driveway” where an “altercation” ensued, Lt. McDonald said. Browner allegedly assaulted the father-in-law, then drove from the scene before police arrived.

McDonald said officers as of Wednesday morning still had not been able to speak with Browner. Their investigation continues.

The Seahawks signed Browner, 31, in April to a no-risk, one-year contract for the NFL’s veteran minimum of $760,000, none of it guaranteed. That was after he had one, bad season with New Orleans and a successive one winning a Super Bowl with New England. Seattle is hoping the original member of its “Legion of Boom” secondary in its 2013 championship season proves worthy of playing a unique, match-up coverage role on bigger receivers in select situations this fall. If he doesn’t, the team can cut him with no money lost.

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