WSU Cougars

Cougars prepared to flush loss to Colorado and move on

The Spokesman-Review

Washington State running back Gerard Wicks (23) looks for an opening against Colorado linebacker Rick Gamboa (32) in the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016, in Boulder, Colo.
Washington State running back Gerard Wicks (23) looks for an opening against Colorado linebacker Rick Gamboa (32) in the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016, in Boulder, Colo. AP

The muddy lining to all the winning the Washington State Cougars have done this season before Saturday’s 38-24 hiccup at Colorado is this: The Cougars haven’t won a football game the week after losing one.

WSU (8-3, 7-1 Pac-12) used a bye week to break out of its rut after it lost the first two games of the season, and the Cougars have not lost since.

Now the Cougars have to pick themselves up after an emotional loss and get ready to play the biggest game of the year, the Apple Cup, against the highest-ranked team they will face all year.

And they have one less day to prepare, since the powers that be insist the game against the No. 6 Washington Huskies (10-1, 7-1) be played on the Friday after Thanksgiving.

Perhaps the game’s magnitude will make it easier to flush the loss.

“I think it (helps),” linebacker Parker Henry said after the loss. “This is a feeling we haven’t had in a while, and we don’t want it again. We’ve got no choice but to flush it. Next week is a huge game, so as soon as that plane lands and we get this film done, we’ve got to move on.”

All the games leading up to the Apple Cup held equal importance insofar as that they each played a part in creating the situation where the winner of Saturday’s game is guaranteed to win the Pac-12 North division.

“You want to win every game,” quarterback Luke Falk said. “You only have so many of these

opportunities.”

Few players from either school have ever had an opportunity like this one, however. In essence, WSU and UW are about to play a Pac-12 championship semifinal game.

The loss to Colorado might have stung the Cougars’ psyches, but it had no impact on WSU’s ability to win its division, and it sets up a possible rematch with the Buffaloes in the Pac-12 championship game with a Rose Bowl berth on the line.

Colorado was the better team against Washington State, without question. But the Cougars had a chance to take a 21-7 lead when the Pac-12’s all-time receptions leader Gabe Marks dropped a pass he catches 99 times out of 100 tries.

WSU should feel good about its chances in another game against Colorado, which much like the Cougars, can lock up its division with a home win over its rival this week.

An Apple Cup with so much at stake will be a new experience for the players of both teams. Since the “Crapple Cup” in 2008 that saw a matchup of two teams with one win between them, Friday’s game will be the first Apple Cup between two teams with at least eight victories.

Assuming Falk does not injure himself between now and Friday, this will be the first Apple Cup since 2013, and second since 2010, in which the Cougars have their regular starting quarterback available.

The Huskies are still hoping for a College Football Playoff spot, and will likely get one if they win the Apple Cup and the Pac-12 championship. Louisville losing this past weekend will likely move the Huskies up a spot in the playoff rankings, and two more games against ranked opponents can only help UW’s resume.

The chance of WSU getting into the Rose Bowl with an Apple Cup loss, thanks to UW playing in the playoffs, ended with WSU’s loss on Saturday. But as long as the Cougars win, it won’t matter.

The Apple Cup, which was last played in Pullman in 2014, always a worthy prize. But it pales in comparison with the prospect of roses.

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