Nooksack Tribe member Mark Cooper and his partner Crystal Jack haul coho salmon from his canoe in 2012 after catching them at the Cooper family traditional fishing area at the confluence of the north and south forks of the Nooksack River. Cooper said the low water level in the river caused his fishing net to become fouled with slime, making it easier for fish to avoid the net.
Nooksack Tribe member Mark Cooper and his partner Crystal Jack haul coho salmon from his canoe in 2012 after catching them at the Cooper family traditional fishing area at the confluence of the north and south forks of the Nooksack River. Cooper said the low water level in the river caused his fishing net to become fouled with slime, making it easier for fish to avoid the net. PHILIP A. DWYER THE BELLINGHAM HERALD
Nooksack Tribe member Mark Cooper and his partner Crystal Jack haul coho salmon from his canoe in 2012 after catching them at the Cooper family traditional fishing area at the confluence of the north and south forks of the Nooksack River. Cooper said the low water level in the river caused his fishing net to become fouled with slime, making it easier for fish to avoid the net. PHILIP A. DWYER THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

Community Conversation: River water levels key to tribal fishing rights, endangered fish

August 07, 2015 05:01 PM