Chris Reykdal, Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, talks to reporters about his long-term plan for funding public education in Washington state in 2017 in Olympia. He urged legislators Wednesday to “get more courageous” by putting a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would enable voters to more easily approve school district bonds by doing away with the current 60 percent “supermajority” requirement.
Chris Reykdal, Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, talks to reporters about his long-term plan for funding public education in Washington state in 2017 in Olympia. He urged legislators Wednesday to “get more courageous” by putting a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would enable voters to more easily approve school district bonds by doing away with the current 60 percent “supermajority” requirement. Ted S. Warren AP
Chris Reykdal, Washington’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, talks to reporters about his long-term plan for funding public education in Washington state in 2017 in Olympia. He urged legislators Wednesday to “get more courageous” by putting a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would enable voters to more easily approve school district bonds by doing away with the current 60 percent “supermajority” requirement. Ted S. Warren AP