Allen Richardson, center, a Koch Industries lobbyist, attending a hunting retreat with several Republican secretaries of state in Downs, Kan., Oct. 10, 2016. Big-money corporate lobbying has reached into one of the most obscure corners of state government: the offices of secretaries of state, the people charged with running elections impartially.
Allen Richardson, center, a Koch Industries lobbyist, attending a hunting retreat with several Republican secretaries of state in Downs, Kan., Oct. 10, 2016. Big-money corporate lobbying has reached into one of the most obscure corners of state government: the offices of secretaries of state, the people charged with running elections impartially. Kevin D. Liles The New York Times
Allen Richardson, center, a Koch Industries lobbyist, attending a hunting retreat with several Republican secretaries of state in Downs, Kan., Oct. 10, 2016. Big-money corporate lobbying has reached into one of the most obscure corners of state government: the offices of secretaries of state, the people charged with running elections impartially. Kevin D. Liles The New York Times