A guard’s station is seen during a tour of the Tecumseh State Correctional Institution in Tecumseh, Neb., in 2015. Nebraska has shifted its focus to treatment and rehabilitation instead of building more prisons. The U.S. Congress is debating a law that would ease the mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines for future nonviolent offenders (mostly drug criminals), allow many of those already incarcerated out of prison ahead of schedule and ease their path back into society and the workforce.
A guard’s station is seen during a tour of the Tecumseh State Correctional Institution in Tecumseh, Neb., in 2015. Nebraska has shifted its focus to treatment and rehabilitation instead of building more prisons. The U.S. Congress is debating a law that would ease the mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines for future nonviolent offenders (mostly drug criminals), allow many of those already incarcerated out of prison ahead of schedule and ease their path back into society and the workforce. Nati Harnik Associated Press
A guard’s station is seen during a tour of the Tecumseh State Correctional Institution in Tecumseh, Neb., in 2015. Nebraska has shifted its focus to treatment and rehabilitation instead of building more prisons. The U.S. Congress is debating a law that would ease the mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines for future nonviolent offenders (mostly drug criminals), allow many of those already incarcerated out of prison ahead of schedule and ease their path back into society and the workforce. Nati Harnik Associated Press

‘Sentencing reform’ is seriously stuck in Senate

May 15, 2016 12:01 AM