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Girl with autism got D's on report card, dad says. So he made his own grading system

Shane Jackson, from Tasmania, Australia, said his daughter Sophie, who is autistic, was crushed after getting straight D's on her school report card. The dad decided to make a report card of his own — and his tweet about it quickly spread
Shane Jackson, from Tasmania, Australia, said his daughter Sophie, who is autistic, was crushed after getting straight D's on her school report card. The dad decided to make a report card of his own — and his tweet about it quickly spread Twitter — Shane Jackson

Shane Jackson says his daughter was crushed after getting D's on her report card — so he decided to make his own grading system.

The father from Tasmania, Australia, wrote on Twitter that his daughter Sophie, who is autistic, was crying and saying that "I've let everyone down" after she got the bad news.

Jackson told The Huffington Post that the 10-year-old has been "working so hard" and going to tutoring lessons after she got D's at school last year as well.

"We and Sophie were really positive that there may have been some improvements,” he said. “Then Sophie received the report and she was just so disappointed because she had tried so hard and honestly thought that she may be at a higher level than last year.

"From our perspective we know she had tried hard and were very comfortable with her effort, whatever the report said."

But on the report card that Jackson made for Sophie, the little girl is getting nothing but straight A's. She scored A's on the categories of "funny," "loves dogs," "fighting with the boys" and "drawing and making robots" — and an A-plus for "imagination" and being the "best daughter ever."

His tweet amassed over 8,000 shares on Twitter, along with 50,000 likes and hundreds of replies.

People said they loved his report card.

And Sophie, it seems, really enjoyed it, too. Jackson said in an interview with The Daily Mail that the report card had the "best impact."

"Next day she bumped out of the house, beaming, ready for school," he said. "As a parent of an autistic child, I'd like to tell other parents that they are not alone as I understand it can get challenging."

The 10-year-old girl even made a Twitter account of her own now. She's so far posted three different pictures of her artwork.

But that's not all she is sharing on her Twitter account. Sophie turned the tables on her dad and gave him a report card of her own.

She seems to be a tougher grader than her father, as she gave him a C for "wrestles me" and a B for being "funny."

Still, he got an A for "is annoying" and "loves me" — and another pair of A-pluses for "made me a Twitter" and being the "best dad ever."

In the U.S. boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism than girls, but not because they suffer more. There’s growing evidence of a social camouflaging effect among girls with autism that might be preventing them from getting diagnosed.

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