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How lawmakers voted in Olympia

March 4 was the last day for lawmakers to consider bills passed by the opposite chamber. Hereafter, only budget related matters, initiatives, and differences between bills passed by both houses may be considered. The regular legislative session is set to adjourn March 10. Here are WashingtonVotes.org’s picks for this week’s notable roll call votes.

Senate Bill 6246: Making 2016 supplemental operating appropriations. Passed the Senate on Feb. 26, 2016 by a vote p 25-22 two members excused.

This is the Senate version of the supplemental budget for the 2015-17 biennium, It would add some $49 million in additional spending to the existing $38.2 billion state budget, including $6.6 million for charter schools, without raising taxes. The House plan, passed earlier, would spend an additional $476 million and rely on $120 million in new taxes. House and Senate negotiators now have six days left until adjournment of the regular session to iron out the differences between their respective proposals.

40th Sen. Kevin Ranker, D-Orcas Island: No

42nd Sen. Doug Ericksen, F-Ferndale: Yes

House Bill 2280: Making felony driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor, marijuana, or any drug a class B felony. Passed the Senate on March 2, 2016 by a vote of 47-0, two members excused.

This bill, which passed the House unanimously in February, doubles the penalties for driving-under-the-influence (DUI) violations. Current law makes a fifth conviction for DUI within 10 years a Class C felony, carrying a maximum of five years in prison, a $10,000 fine or both. Under this bill, a fifth DUI conviction is a Class B felony, with a maximum prison sentence of 10 years, a $ 20,000 fine or both. The measure is now headed to the Governor for his signature.

40th Sen. Kevin Ranker, D-Orcas Island: Yes

42nd Sen. Doug Ericksen, F-Ferndale: Yes

House Bill 1553: Providing for certificates of restoration of opportunity. Passed the Senate on March 3, 2016 by a vote of 49-0.

This bill allows persons with criminal records access to occupational licenses from which they are currently barred. It creates a process for granting a Certificate of Restoration of Opportunity, and prohibits state and local governments from disqualifying an applicant for a license to engage in certain professions solely on the person’s criminal history. The bill passed the House unanimously in February, and the Senate added some restrictions, such as excluding those with convictions for the most serious offenses.

40th Sen. Kevin Ranker, D-Orcas Island: Yes

42nd Sen. Doug Ericksen, F-Ferndale: Yes

House Bill 2908: Establishing the joint legislative task force on the use of deadly force in community policing. Passed the Senate on March 1, 2016 by a vote of 45-2, two members excused.

This bill creates a task force on the use of deadly force in community policing standards to protect the public, as well as members of law enforcement who may be faced with the need to use deadly force. The task force will be required to review laws, practices, and training programs regarding the use of deadly force; current policies, practices, and tools used by or otherwise available to law enforcement as an alternative to lethal uses of force; and proposals for modifications to the statutory standards for justifiable homicide and criminal liability. The bill passed unanimously in the House on February 16th.

40th Sen. Kevin Ranker, D-Orcas Island: Yes

42nd Sen. Doug Ericksen, F-Ferndale: Yes

House Bill 2872: Concerning the recruitment and retention of Washington State Patrol commissioned officers. Passed the House on March 2, 2016 by a vote of 85-12, one member excused.

This bill directs state agencies to implement the recommendations of the Washington State Patrol Trooper Recruitment and Retention Study released earlier this year, including making officers’ pay competitive with that of other law enforcement agencies. The bill specifies that state patrol trooper salaries must meet the average compensation paid to officers of corresponding rank at six other law enforcement agencies around the state, including the Seattle and Spokane Police Departments.

40th Rep. Kristine Lytton, D-Anacortes: Yes

40th Rep. Jeff Morris, D-Mount Vernon: Yes

42nd Rep. Vincent Buys, R-Lynden: Yes

42nd Rep. Luanne Van Werven, R-Lynden: Yes

WashingtonVotes.org is a project of the Washington Policy Center.

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