In this Feb. 28, 2001, file photo, a passerby looks at the damage to the ornate facade that broke off from the Washington Federal Savings building at Capitol Way and 5th Avenue in Olympia, Wash., after a powerful earthquake hit the Northwest region. When North America’s undersea edge and a tectonic plate pushing beneath it inevitably give way to three centuries of accumulated stress, unleashing a monster earthquake and tsunami in the Pacific Northwest, the expected catastrophic loss of life and economic disruptions could be lessened by an early warning system.
In this Feb. 28, 2001, file photo, a passerby looks at the damage to the ornate facade that broke off from the Washington Federal Savings building at Capitol Way and 5th Avenue in Olympia, Wash., after a powerful earthquake hit the Northwest region. When North America’s undersea edge and a tectonic plate pushing beneath it inevitably give way to three centuries of accumulated stress, unleashing a monster earthquake and tsunami in the Pacific Northwest, the expected catastrophic loss of life and economic disruptions could be lessened by an early warning system. Bruce Kelman AP
In this Feb. 28, 2001, file photo, a passerby looks at the damage to the ornate facade that broke off from the Washington Federal Savings building at Capitol Way and 5th Avenue in Olympia, Wash., after a powerful earthquake hit the Northwest region. When North America’s undersea edge and a tectonic plate pushing beneath it inevitably give way to three centuries of accumulated stress, unleashing a monster earthquake and tsunami in the Pacific Northwest, the expected catastrophic loss of life and economic disruptions could be lessened by an early warning system. Bruce Kelman AP