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How organizers hope to keep parking and traffic from being a ‘Double Major’ headache

Two Bellingham music giants return for biggest concert in Whatcom County history

Death Cab for Cutie and Odesza are two bands that got their start while band members were students at Western Washington University. On Saturday, May 18, both groups are returning to Bellingham for a benefit concert dubbed “Double Major.”
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Death Cab for Cutie and Odesza are two bands that got their start while band members were students at Western Washington University. On Saturday, May 18, both groups are returning to Bellingham for a benefit concert dubbed “Double Major.”

The sold-out Death Cab for Cutie and Odesza “Double Major” concert will bring about 13,000 concert-goers to Civic Stadium on Saturday, May 18.

Both bands got their start in Bellingham, when members attended Western Washington University, and the benefit concert will raise money for a WWU scholarship endowment fund.

It will be the largest music concert in Bellingham’s history, according to the city of Bellingham.

That many people at Civic Stadium will bring plenty of traffic to the area around 1355 Civic Field Way in the

Puget Neighborhood.

Gates open at 4 p.m on Saturday, the concert begins at 5 p.m. and is expected to end by 11 p.m.

The city said people should expect issues with traffic, parking and noise. Cellular service also may be disrupted during the concert, as well.

Here’s what concert-goers need to know:

Parking

There’s no parking at the concert venue, so make plans to park elsewhere if you’re driving. The parking lots around Civic Field, which includes the stadium, will be used for emergency vehicles, production and operations vehicles, heavy equipment, foot traffic, carpool parking, ride shares, bikes, and staff vehicles.

Taking Lyft, Uber or a taxi? Go to the Arne Hanna Aquatic Center parking lot at 1114 Potter St.

Concert producer, AEG Presents, has offered limited carpool parking passes to ticket buyers. They will be valid for vehicles with a minimum of four concert-goers. Carpool parking will be at the Civic Field Main lot from 2 to 11:59 p.m.

Additional parking can be found in Bellingham at the following locations:

Parking passes and shuttle service to and from Civic Field are on sale through the WWU Alumni Association. Register at alumni.wwu.edu. Shuttle service will run from 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., before the concert, from WWU’s 12A and C lots, 450 S. College Drive. Those lots are 2 miles southwest of Civic Field. After, shuttle service will be at Civic Field Way and Moore Street from 9:30 p.m. to midnight.

Lincoln Creek Park & Ride, 800 Lincoln St. The lot is 1 mile south of Civic Field and is on the WTA bus route.

Commercial Street Parking Garage, 1300 Commercial St. in the downtown. It is 1.5 miles west of Civic Field and three blocks from the WTA downtown station. More spaces downtown can be found at downtownbellingham.com/parking.

Ride the bus

Whatcom Transportation Authority will provide extra bus service on the day of the concert, Saturday, May 18.

Before the show, take these routes to Civic Field Stadium: 190, 512, 525, 533 and 540.

After, catch Routes 190 or 512 on Puget Street, directly outside the main exit. This is the only place where the bus will pick up concert-goers after the show. These also will be the only routes operating then.

Route 190 will go to WWU and downtown via Lincoln Street, Bill McDonald Parkway, High Street and Billy Frank Jr. Street.

Route 512 will head to downtown by way of Lakeway Drive and Holly Street.

Rides cost $1 cash in exact change only or WTA bus passes.

Details

Go to cob.org/doublemajor for general information, including updates on parking and traffic revisions.

Call 360-676-7433 or go to ridewta.com for bus route and schedule information.

Go to alumni.wwu.edu/wwualumniweekend for more on the Western Washington University Alumni Weekend events.

Kie Relyea has been a reporter at The Bellingham Herald since 1997 and currently writes about social services and recreation in Whatcom County. She started her career in 1991 as a reporter and editor in Northern California.
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