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Here’s why the Space Needle and millions of other places will go dark Saturday night

ESA marks 20 years of space station module with timelapse

The European Space Agency released footage on November 19 showing the Earth from the International Space Station (ISS) in a timelapse video. The footage was released to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the launch of the first ISS module, Zarya.
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The European Space Agency released footage on November 19 showing the Earth from the International Space Station (ISS) in a timelapse video. The footage was released to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the launch of the first ISS module, Zarya.

Residents around the world are being urged to turn off the lights in their homes for one hour Saturday night as part of Earth Hour, an annual effort to appreciate the planet.

Private homes, skyscrapers and landmarks from Niagara Falls to the Space Needle will darken at 8:30 p.m. local time as part of the World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) annual event, according to its website.

“Together we’ll speak up for wildlife and forests,” WWF said. “We’ll show our support for rivers and oceans. And we’ll rally around crucial actions needed to curb climate change.”

Earth Hour began in 2007 in Sydney, Australia.

While you’re enjoying the solitude of darkness, step outside and look toward the west, about 45 degrees from the horizon and you might catch a glimpse of the International Space Station as it glides overhead from 8:34 p.m. to 8:41 p.m. Saturday.

In the same general direction, according to Sky & Telescope magazine, Bellingham residents can see the constellation Taurus, the planet Mars and the Pleiades — a fuzzy star cluster also called the Seven Sisters.

Robert Mittendorf covers civic issues, weather, traffic and how people are coping with the high cost of housing for The Bellingham Herald. A journalist since 1984, he’s also a volunteer firefighter for South Whatcom Fire Authority.
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