Images of smoke particles from WWU’s scanning electron microscope show, clockwise from top left:  a 1 micron soot particle magnified 30,000 times; 10 micron particle of wood plant debris magnified 8,000 times; 2 micron soot particle coated with tar-like goo magnified 25,000 times; soot and woody debris magnified 15,000 times; a ; 0.7 micron tar ball (the orange sphere) and soot particle magnified 14,000 times; and a 100 nanometer-wide soot particle, magnified 80,000 times. The web-like pattern is the filter used to snare the particles.
Images of smoke particles from WWU’s scanning electron microscope show, clockwise from top left: a 1 micron soot particle magnified 30,000 times; 10 micron particle of wood plant debris magnified 8,000 times; 2 micron soot particle coated with tar-like goo magnified 25,000 times; soot and woody debris magnified 15,000 times; a ; 0.7 micron tar ball (the orange sphere) and soot particle magnified 14,000 times; and a 100 nanometer-wide soot particle, magnified 80,000 times. The web-like pattern is the filter used to snare the particles. Mike Kraft, Western Washington University Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald
Images of smoke particles from WWU’s scanning electron microscope show, clockwise from top left: a 1 micron soot particle magnified 30,000 times; 10 micron particle of wood plant debris magnified 8,000 times; 2 micron soot particle coated with tar-like goo magnified 25,000 times; soot and woody debris magnified 15,000 times; a ; 0.7 micron tar ball (the orange sphere) and soot particle magnified 14,000 times; and a 100 nanometer-wide soot particle, magnified 80,000 times. The web-like pattern is the filter used to snare the particles. Mike Kraft, Western Washington University Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

Ugh! Look what was in the wildfire smoke we were breathing

September 09, 2018 05:00 AM