Local

Prices at the pump starting to hurt? Here's the cheapest day of the week to fill up

Why are gas prices rising so fast this spring?

Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, explains why the national average price of gasoline is now its priciest since July 2015. GasBuddy is a smartphone app that uses crowd-sourced information to track gas prices.
Up Next
Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, explains why the national average price of gasoline is now its priciest since July 2015. GasBuddy is a smartphone app that uses crowd-sourced information to track gas prices.

We're all feeling the pain at the pump. Gas prices in Whatcom County are averaging $3.46 per gallon on Monday, according to smartphone app GasBuddy — highest in the state, 17 cents above the state average of $3.29 and more than 65 cents higher than the national average of $2.80.

But there is some relief to be had — you just have to plan ahead.

Tuesday is the cheapest day of the week to fill up at the pump in Washington state, according to a GasBuddy study, while filling up on Saturday will likely cost you a little more.

GasBuddy conducted a three-month study from January through March to reveal the optimal days to fill-up and save money and found prices in the Evergreen State tended to be at their lowest on Tuesdays, while Saturdays saw the highest prices.

The study also took a look at which days tended to see the most traffic and longest lines at the pump around the country, finding that Sunday and Monday were the least busy and Thursday and Friday were the most busy. Monday and Tuesday between 8 and 10 a.m. were found to be the best times.

“Consumers are missing a big opportunity at the pump when it comes to saving time and money,” head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy Patrick DeHaan said in a story with the study. “Our data shows that most motorists are filling up on not only the most expensive day, but the busiest. Having a tank of gas last until Sunday or even Monday each week can collectively save drivers $2.6 billion, and spare the headache of not being able to find an available pump.”

Related stories from Bellingham Herald

  Comments