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The old ‘acid ball’ has a new home. Here’s what else you need to know about the artifact

Acid ball rolls into new park on Bellingham waterfront

An Oxbo Mega Transport Solutions moves the acid ball 1,000 feet to Waypoint Park at the waterfront development site in Bellingham, Wednesday , Feb. 21, 2018, where it will be turned into public art.
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An Oxbo Mega Transport Solutions moves the acid ball 1,000 feet to Waypoint Park at the waterfront development site in Bellingham, Wednesday , Feb. 21, 2018, where it will be turned into public art.

The old “acid ball” has a new home after its move on Wednesday.

Oxbo Mega Transport Solutions crews slowly moved this rusty artifact of the waterfront’s industrial past.

Here’s a look at the ball and the project by the numbers:

▪ Circa 1938. That is the ball’s era. It is a remnant of the closed Georgia-Pacific pulp and paper mill on the waterfront. The tank stored acid that helped break down wood chips at the mill.

▪ About 1,000 feet. That’s how far it was moved from its old spot to its new place at the front edge of the new Waypoint Park in Bellingham, where it will get a second life as public art next to the Whatcom Waterway.

▪ More than 400,000 pounds. That’s about how much the steel orb weighs.

▪ It’s more than 32 feet in diameter.

▪ 40 feet. That’s about how tall it is, including the 8-foot legs that support the ball.

▪ About $63,000. That’s the cost of moving it.

▪ $130,000. That’s how much it’s going to cost to transform it into artwork.

The ball will be coated with luminescent glass beads and enhanced with LED lighting to illuminate the ball during the day and night.

The beads will be sprayed on, and the artwork is expected to be completed in late spring or summer, weather permitting and in coordination with the opening of the park, City of Bellingham officials said.

Mutuus Studio of Burien is doing the artwork.

The city’s Percent for the Arts is paying for the artwork, Bellingham officials said. The program allocates 1 percent of the budget from the city’s largest projects to incorporate artwork.

The Port of Bellingham posted this time lapse video of crews moving a former Georgia-Pacific storage tank, dubbed the "acid ball," to a new site on the downtown waterfront, where it will be remade as public art.

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