FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2004, file photo, Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania, Va., Circuit Court. Malvo’s lawyer said Tuesday Malvo is entitled to a new hearing to ask for a lighter sentence, under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles unconstitutional. Malvo was 17 when he was arrested in a series of random shootings that killed 10 people and wounded three in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia in 2002.
FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2004, file photo, Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania, Va., Circuit Court. Malvo’s lawyer said Tuesday Malvo is entitled to a new hearing to ask for a lighter sentence, under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles unconstitutional. Malvo was 17 when he was arrested in a series of random shootings that killed 10 people and wounded three in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia in 2002. Mike Morones AP
FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2004, file photo, Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania, Va., Circuit Court. Malvo’s lawyer said Tuesday Malvo is entitled to a new hearing to ask for a lighter sentence, under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles unconstitutional. Malvo was 17 when he was arrested in a series of random shootings that killed 10 people and wounded three in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia in 2002. Mike Morones AP

Sniper who terrorized nation’s capital, killed 10 seeks lighter sentence

January 24, 2018 09:53 AM