FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2004, file photo, Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania, Va., Circuit Court. Malvo’s lawyer said Tuesday Malvo is entitled to a new hearing to ask for a lighter sentence, under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles unconstitutional. Malvo was 17 when he was arrested in a series of random shootings that killed 10 people and wounded three in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia in 2002.
FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2004, file photo, Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania, Va., Circuit Court. Malvo’s lawyer said Tuesday Malvo is entitled to a new hearing to ask for a lighter sentence, under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles unconstitutional. Malvo was 17 when he was arrested in a series of random shootings that killed 10 people and wounded three in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia in 2002. Mike Morones AP
FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2004, file photo, Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania, Va., Circuit Court. Malvo’s lawyer said Tuesday Malvo is entitled to a new hearing to ask for a lighter sentence, under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles unconstitutional. Malvo was 17 when he was arrested in a series of random shootings that killed 10 people and wounded three in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia in 2002. Mike Morones AP