Whatcom Magazine

Bellingham's Honey Moon offers array of meads, hard ciders

Honey Moon in Bellingham makes mead, cider and numerous blends of each with fruit, herbs and spices.
Honey Moon in Bellingham makes mead, cider and numerous blends of each with fruit, herbs and spices. Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

What is Honey Moon? Honey Moon makes mead, cider, and numerous blends of each with fruit, herbs and spices. It also serves a light menu of soups, salads, cheeses, appetizers and desserts, and is a venue for musicians, performance artists, poets and visual artists.

Located at 1053 N. State St., on the alley, Honey Moon is open 5 to 11 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, with live music nightly at 8:30. Details: 360-734-0728 and honeymoonmeads.com.

What is the mead and cider made from? Mead is wine made from honey. Honey Moon uses mainly blackberry and fireweed honey from a Skagit County beekeeper.

It meads are blended with fruit wines made from raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, and strawberries from Curt Maberry Farm and other local producers. The herbs, teas and spices come from a Seattle supplier.

Bellingham Extra CiderHead uses apples from local yards, parks and trails.

Honey Moon also makes hard apple cider, with most of its juice from BelleWood Acres. Its blends of apple cider and fruit wines — Cranberry CiderHead, Raspberry CiderHead, Blueberry CiderHead, and Rhubarb CiderHead — mostly use fruit from Whatcom County, and cranberries from an organic farmer on Olympic Peninsula.

Where can I buy them? Honey Moon’s bottles and cans are sold at Haggen, Community Food Coop, Elizabeth Station, BelleWood Acres, Terra Organic & Natural Foods, and other local stores, restaurants and bars.

What’s new? Honey Moon is bottling its Cranberry CiderHead this autumn for Thanksgiving, and is bottling its Semi-Sweet Session CiderHead, which is slightly sweeter and less alcoholic than its traditional CiderHead.

Honey Moon is also offering a Bellingham Extra CiderHead, a hard apple cider made from apples contributed by local families and picked from yards, parks and trails. They call it their “local-er cider.”

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