Whatcom Magazine

Seattleites covet ‘hot spot’ Bellingham

The Community Boating Center in Fairhaven hosts “farewell flotillas” at which kayakers, paddle boarders and people in other watercraft say goodbye when an Alaska ferry departs Bellingham Ferry Terminal. The center was one of several local amenities cited in the May 2015 issue of Better Homes and Gardens, which described Bellingham as an up-and-coming “hot spot” community.
The Community Boating Center in Fairhaven hosts “farewell flotillas” at which kayakers, paddle boarders and people in other watercraft say goodbye when an Alaska ferry departs Bellingham Ferry Terminal. The center was one of several local amenities cited in the May 2015 issue of Better Homes and Gardens, which described Bellingham as an up-and-coming “hot spot” community. FOR THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

News about what other people are saying about Whatcom County:

Size matters

Better than Seattle: In the April 9 issue of Crosscut, an online news magazine in Seattle, Bellingham native Ted Van Dyk explains why he decided to leave his adopted city of Seattle and return to his roots. In his piece, “Why Bellingham looks better than Seattle,” Van Dyk says Seattle is congested, expensive and has drifted away from its blue-collar, middle-class roots to become “a city of rich and poor.”

Still better than Seattle: Van Dyk shows up again in a July 8 article in Seattle Weekly by Ellis Conklin. The story’s headline says it all: “Clamoring for Calmer, Cheaper, Greener Pastures, Fed-Up Seattleites Are Moving to Bellingham.”

More praise for Bellingham

“Hot spot:” The May 2015 issue of Better Homes and Gardens featured Bellingham as that month’s “On Location” hot spot, which looks at up-and-coming cities across the country. Highlights cited by the magazine include the Community Boating Center in Fairhaven, Honey Moon Mead and Cider, workshops at Otion: The Soap Bar, Taylor Shellfish Samish Farm Store, and The Chrysalis Inn and Spa.

Smart planning: Gov. Jay Inslee announced that Bellingham won a 2015 Smart Vision Award for the city’s work on its downtown plan. Judges noted that the Downtown Bellingham Plan was the broadest, most inclusive look at downtown issues they had seen.

Good place to teach: Bellingham is the 16th best place in the U.S. for teachers, according to GoodCall, a research group. Factors included salaries, cost of living, job availability, and educational values in the community. Olympia ranked 10th in the country.

Not as bad as others: Bellingham ranked 53rd among 110 communities as the worst place to live in Washington, according to HomeSnacks website. The worst place to live, according to the list, was Centralia, with Bremerton in second place. Ferndale was the 69th worst place to live, and Lynden ranked 79th. The bottom of the worst list — and thus the best place to live in the state — went to Klahanie, an upscale community in east King County.

No praise for Bellingham

Snob city: With its proliferation of craft breweries, Bellingham now has another claim to beer fame. It’s the “Snobbiest Beer City in America,” according to Priceonomics, which found that 92 percent of bars in Bellingham did not serve Bud Light, Coors Light or Miller Light.

Schools win notice

Coastal beauty: Western Washington University came in 18th among the 30 most beautiful coastal college campuses in the country, according to Best Value Schools website. One other Washington school made the list; Seattle Pacific University was no. 25. The prettiest coastal school? Pepperdine University, in Malibu, Calif.

Good schools: For the first time, Bellingham, Sehome and Squalicum high schools were all named to U.S News & World Report’s list of the best high schools in America. Out of 458 public and private high schools in Washington, Bellingham High ranked 34th, Sehome was 26th and Squalicum came in 24th.

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