Families

Here are some library books you and your kids may want to check out this summer

Public libraries in Bellingham and throughout Whatcom County have teamed up to provide summer reading fun for all ages – babies, kids, teens and adults, featuring popular bingo-card formats for each age group.
Public libraries in Bellingham and throughout Whatcom County have teamed up to provide summer reading fun for all ages – babies, kids, teens and adults, featuring popular bingo-card formats for each age group. Getty Images

Here comes summer! Kids are ready to get out of school. Summer reading at your library is not only a tradition, it’s fun, and reading every day will keep kids’ minds engaged and active.

“Summer is a time to emphasize the fun side of reading,” Whatcom County Library System’s children’s services coordinator Tammy LaPlante said. “This is when kids and teens get to read what they want, and personal choice is a great way to encourage excitement around reading.”

Public libraries in Bellingham and throughout Whatcom County have teamed up to provide summer reading fun for all ages – babies, kids, teens and adults, featuring popular bingo-card formats for each age group. Every youth who sets and meets a reading goal will receive a book to keep and adults can enter to win prizes.

It’s easy to participate – bingo cards will be available at all area public library locations (and online) from June 1 through Aug. 31. Special summer reading events are scheduled at area libraries as well, including craft fairs, games and much more. Visit your local library in person or online for more information.

Some summer reading tips from your local librarians:

▪  Reading and listening to books helps keep your child’s brain active and engaged over summer.

▪  Ask your child about their interests and attend a library program to learn something new.

▪  Children are most excited to read when they choose their own books.

▪  Read together as a family and model reading for your kids.

▪  Librarians love to match books to readers – ask us for recommendations.

▪  All library programs are free.

Great summer reads

“Stay: A Girl, A Dog, A Bucket List” by Kate Klise (ages 3-8)

Astrid and Eli have been together since Astrid was born, but, as a dog, Eli is aging much faster than Astrid, and when she is 6 years old, she starts noticing. As Eli progressively gets slower and grayer in color, Astrid makes a bucket list of all the things they can do together before Eli gets too old. Warning: this sweet story may bring you to tears.

“Tales of Bunjitsu Bunny” by John Himmelman (ages 6-8)

Isabel is better at Bunjitsu than any other bunny at her school, and she’s super smart. In this first-in-a-series chapter book, Isabel uses her mind to solve problems, helps others to reach their potential and demonstrates that you don’t have to fight to win.

“Giant Squid” by Candace Fleming (ages 6-10)

Giant Squid are a mystery to scientists, and little was known about them until a few short years ago, when one was filmed in its natural habitat. Fleming’s beautiful prose and Eric Rohmann’s breathtaking illustrations come together to create this most amazing non-fiction picture book.

“Two Truths and a Lie: It’s Alive!” by Ammi-Joan Paquette (ages 8-12)

Each chapter in this surprising non-fiction book contains three stories: two are true and one is a lie. They are all hard to believe, but even the untrue story contains elements of truth. Can you use your investigative skills to figure out which is the lie?

“The First Rule of Punk” by Celia Pérez (ages 9-12)

Twelve-year-old Maria is not happy about leaving Florida to move to Chicago with her Mexican-American mother. She has left everything she loves behind, including her white father, who shares her love of music. Identifying as a punk rocker at her new school causes some problems at first, but Maria is able to overcome adversity by remembering the first rule of punk: be yourself.

And, for the adults who love to read teen fiction...

“The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue” by Mackenzi Lee (ages 15 and up)

Highborn “Monty” Montague is a scoundrel. Kicked out of boarding school, prone to drinking, gambling and using his dimples to win the affections of both sexes, his father has had enough. However, he agrees to send Monty and his best friend (and secret crush), Percy, on a tour through Europe. Predictably making one reckless decision after another, Monty propels everyone into a high-stakes adventure. This historical fiction is funny, exciting, heartbreaking and a genuine joy to read (or listen to).

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