Get Out

Horses put on a show in Lynden, ‘Gleason’ film screens at WWU

Rick Steves will share his European travel tips Monday, Feb. 6, at Bellingham High School in a benefit for the school’s PTSA.
Rick Steves will share his European travel tips Monday, Feb. 6, at Bellingham High School in a benefit for the school’s PTSA. Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

Get travel tips from Rick Steves, and Seattle-based artists Cecilia Concepción Alvarez and Alfredo Arreguín talk about a new exhibit of Chicano art at Whatcom Museum’s Lightcatcher.

Rick Steves at Bellingham High

Rick Steves will review the most important practical travel skills to help turn your European travel dreams into smooth and affordable reality this coming vacation season in an event to benefit Bellingham High School’s PTSA at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6, in the school’s performing arts center, 2020 Cornwall Ave. Freshly back from lots of travels, he’ll explain the practical, money-saving ins and outs of independent travel. His 90-minute seminar is packed with tips on getting the most out of every mile, minute and dollar on your next trip. Read more on the Edmonds author at ricksteves.com. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at Village Books and through Brown Paper Tickets. Info: 360-671-2626, villagebooks.com.

Feb. 2 Get Out Equestrians
The Western Washington University Equestrian Team, a student-run sports club, will host its annual show Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 4 and 5, at the Northwest Washington Fair and Event Center in Lynden. Mikayla King Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

WWU Equestrian Team show in Lynden

The Western Washington University Equestrian Team, a student-run sports club at Western that competes through the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association with schools from British Columbia to Oregon, will host its annual show, run entirely on community support and donations, at 8:30 a.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 4 and 5, at the Northwest Washington Fair and Event Center’s Equine Center, 1775 Front St., in Lynden. Riders range in skill level from beginning walk-trot to open over fences and reining. Both shows will run until all classes have shown – estimated to be about 2 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. There is no admission fee, and it’s open to the public to come watch. Every year, the club requires at least 50 horses in order to host; all of these horses come thanks to community donations from Whatcom, Skagit and Snohomish counties. These horses will be randomly drawn by the competitors, who will then find their horses, get on and be led into the ring – distinct from any other form of showing horses. Info: wwu.equestrians@gmail.com, Emily Wollebek at 425-205-7143, or Mikayla King at 360-722-0707.

Chicano art exhibit opens at the Lightcatcher

Seattle artists Cecilia Concepción Alvarez and Alfredo Arreguín, whose artworks are featured in the exhibition “Images of Resilience: Chicano Art and its Mexican Roots” at Whatcom Museum’s Lightcatcher, 250 Flora St., will talk about their work at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, at the museum’s Old City Hall rotunda room, 121 Prospect St. Alvarez is a self-taught artist whose paintings and murals reflect her perspective on being a Chicana/Latina. She is committed to creating discourse through her art on issues of entitlement and poverty. Arreguín is recognized as one of the originators of the pattern and decoration movement in painting, and he works to promote Mexican culture nationally and internationally. Suggested donation is $5. Info: 360-778-8930, whatcommuseum.org.

Feb. 2 Get Out Brian Cladoosby courtesy Manuel Balce Ceneta
Brian Cladoosby, president of the National Congress of American Indians, will talk about historical trauma Thursday, Feb. 9, at Western Washington University. Manuel Balce Ceneta Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

Tribal leader Brian Cladoosby at WWU

The Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity at Western Washington University welcomes Brian Cladoosby of the National Congress of American Indians at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, in Fraser Hall 101 as part of professor Kathleen Young’s anthropology class called “Cross-Cultural Trauma and Recovery.” His presentation on historical trauma is free and open to the public. In 2013, Cladoosby, chairman of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community and the president of the Association of Washington Tribes, is one of the most senior tribal political leaders in Washington state and the Pacific Northwest and is continually active in tribal and state politics. On an international level, he is the co-speaker of the Coast Salish Gathering, which comprises British Columbia First Nations and Western Washington Tribes. Info: Wolpow.Institute@wwu.edu.

Feb. 2 Get Out Gleason
“Gleason,” a 2016 Sundance Film Festival documentary, chronicles five years in the life of former New Orleans Saints football defensive back Steve Gleason, who was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis when he was 34. The film, which screens Friday, Feb. 3, at Western Washington University’s Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, will feature a talk by the film’s cinematographer and WWU alumnus Ty Minton-Small. Ty Minton-Small Courtesy to The Bellingham Herald

Film about Steve Gleason by WWU grad

“Gleason,” a 2016 Sundance Film Festival documentary, intimately chronicles five years in the life of former New Orleans Saints football defensive back Steve Gleason, who was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis when he was 34. The film, which screens at 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, at WWU’s Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, follows the rapid progression of his disease, taking the audience through his family’s journey as he becomes a father, with all the triumphs, tragedies and struggles as he remains determined to live a purposeful life. WWU alumnus Ty Minton-Small , who graduated in 2011, lived through the laughs and tears from behind the camera as he lived with, filmed and provided care for Gleason during this time and will discuss the film at the event. Following the screening, KING5 News anchor and Western alumna Joyce Taylor will interview him about the making of the film. Free parking is available in Lot 14 G across from the Performing Arts Center. Tickets to the screening are $5, with proceeds supporting student scholarships; any donations above the $5 ticket price are tax-deductible. Registration deadline is Thursday, Feb. 2. Info: 360-650-3353, alumni.wwu.edu

What are you going to get out and do next weekend? Share with Margaret Bikman: 360-715-2273, facebook.com/bellinghamherald. Tell us about your event at least three weeks in advance to be considered for this column.

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