Opinion

Tri-City Herald: Thumbs up to Pasco schools for inviting public to meet superintendent candidates

Show and tell

To Pasco school board members for introducing their field of candidates to the public.

Saundra Hill is retiring as superintendent of the Pasco School District. The school board is searching for her replacement and has narrowed the field from 40 candidates to five.

A meet-and-greet last week with the candidates was scheduled to be a private event — invite only. That would have been an irregular move in a search process — and a mistake.

On the Monday before Wednesday night’s meeting, Board President Ryan Brault announced that the public would be invited to the event after all.

He made the right call.

It’s not easy to be on a board of directors for a public group. Everything you do is scrutinized. Your communications become part of the public record. It’s a microscope many of us would be uncomfortable under.

While Brault didn’t say why the board decided to open the meeting — and we don’t want to second guess him — there is an active parent group on Facebook called Parents for Partnership with Pasco Schools that was concerned about the seemingly secretive process.

There doesn’t have to be animosity between the two groups. We hope there isn’t. The common goal there should be the good of the students. That ought to be enough common ground to build a relationship. And transparency foes a long way to fostering better understanding.

Deadly loophole

To a reporting flaw that allowed guns into the hands of a man who shouldn’t have been able to buy them — with deadly consequences.

Raymond Lee Fryberg, Jr. should not have been able to purchase the gun that ultimately was used by his son in the Marysville school shooting last fall.

The Tulalip Tribal Court had issued a domestic violence protection order against him and prohibited him from purchasing firearms. But the order was never entered into any state or federal criminal databases as it would have been if it had come through a county court.

Because they are a sovereign nation, tribal courts are not required to submit the court records to the federal database.

People bent on causing harm usually find a way to it make it happen. There’s no guarantee someone wouldn’t have died at his hand anyway, but perhaps if that particular gun had not been available, five teens would be alive today

To keep this from happening again, agencies need to find a way to share information on gun sales restrictions.

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