Opinion

Our Voice: We’re grateful for people who help self and others

We’re grateful in the Mid-Columbia for opportunities to help those who can’t help themselves, like the children who need the Safe Harbor Crisis Nursery, and those who are willing to help themselves, if only given the opportunity, like the families that participate in Habitat for Humanity.

Beggars Banquet

The community rallied around Safe Harbor Crisis Nursery earlier in the year when it looked like it might have to shut its doors. The push generated $120,000.

On Saturday the Beggars Banquet will again be raising money for Safe Harbor and My Friends Place, the only homeless teen shelter in the area.

We appreciate all those who have donated to keep the important agencies functioning in our community. One time donations helped get the community over a slump, but it takes ongoing support to build a legacy.

And we’re not the only ones who recognize the good that comes into kids’ lives when people care.

The Gibson guitar company has donated two new electric guitars to help raise money at the banquet.

One will be auctioned one will be raffled. They retail for about $1,000 each.

The Beggars Banquet is 6 p.m. Saturday and the cost is $35 per person or $70 per couple.

Tickets are available at tinyurl/beggarsbanquet2014. For more information call, 509-783-5734.

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity has been bettering the lives of families in the Mid-Columbia for 20 years. They have built 87 homes and none have gone into default.

That’s a pretty good percentage, perhaps because they feel such ownership for their homes.

Now the agency is ready to start its biggest project yet, a four-acre plot that will become 24 new houses over the next three years.

That’s 24 more families with stable housing.

Most people want to work for what they receive.

Families that are eligible for a Habitat for Humanity home must put 500 hours of sweat equity into their house.

They have ownership of actually paying the mortgage and driving the nails to hang the sheet rock.

They literally are working to put a roof over their heads. And that is a good feeling.

Many volunteers labor alongside the families. They get to share in that good feeling.

There’s lots of ways to be involved.

For more information check out their website at www.habitatbuilds.com or call 509-943-5555.

Families that go this route are committed to their neighborhoods. They put down roots and contribute to their communities.

It’s a win for all of the Mid-Columbia, not just for the families that receive housing.

We’re grateful in the Mid-Columbia for opportunities to help those who can’t help themselves, like the children who need the Safe Harbor Crisis Nursery, and those who are willing to help themselves, if only given the opportunity, like the families that participate in Habitat for Humanity.

Beggars Banquet

The community rallied about Safe Harbor Crisis Nursery earlier in the year when it looked like they might have to shut their doors. The push for funds generated $120,000 for the cause.

On Saturday the Beggars Banquet will again be raising funds for Safe Harbor and My Friends Place, the only homeless teen shelter in the area.

We appreciate all those how have donated to keep the important agencies functioning in our community. One time donations helped get the community over a slump, but it takes ongoing support to build a legacy.

And we’re not the only ones who recognize the good that comes into kids’ lives when people care.

The Gibson guitar company has donated two brand new guitars to help fundraise for the banquet. One will be auctioned one will be raffled. They retail for around $1,000 each.

If you want to attend the Beggars Banquet it’s 6 p.m. Saturday and the cost is $35 per person or $70 per couple. Tickets are available at tinyurl/beggarsbanquet2014. For more information call, 509-783-5734.

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity has been bettering the lives of families in the Mid-Columbia for 20 years. They have built 87 homes and none of them has gone into default. That’s a pretty good percentage, perhaps because they feel such an ownership for their homes.

Now the agency is ready to start its biggest project yet, a four-acre plot of land that will become 24 new homes over the next three years. That’s 24 more families with stable housing.

Most people want to work for what they receive.

Families who are eligible for a Habitat for Humanity’ home must put 500 hours of sweat equity into the their house. They have ownership of actually paying the mortgage and driving the nails to hang the sheet rock.

They are working to put a literal roof over their heads. And that is a good feeling.

Many volunteers labor alongside the family on each home. They get to share in that good feeling. There’s lots of ways to be involved. For more information check out their website at www.habitatbuilds.com or call 509-943-5555.

Families that go this route are committed to their neighborhoods. They put down roots and contribute to their communities.

It’s a win for all of the Mid-Columbia, not just for the families that receive housing.

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