Sam George, left, and Howard Wahpat, both tribal fishermen, catch salmon with a gill net on the Columbia River near Mosier, Ore., July 28, 2016. After a major train derailment nearly spilled 47,000 gallons of heavy Bakken crude oil into the Columbia River, the issue of transporting the volatile material across environmentally sensitive areas in the Pacific Northwest moved to front and center in the public debate.
Sam George, left, and Howard Wahpat, both tribal fishermen, catch salmon with a gill net on the Columbia River near Mosier, Ore., July 28, 2016. After a major train derailment nearly spilled 47,000 gallons of heavy Bakken crude oil into the Columbia River, the issue of transporting the volatile material across environmentally sensitive areas in the Pacific Northwest moved to front and center in the public debate. Leah Nash NYT
Sam George, left, and Howard Wahpat, both tribal fishermen, catch salmon with a gill net on the Columbia River near Mosier, Ore., July 28, 2016. After a major train derailment nearly spilled 47,000 gallons of heavy Bakken crude oil into the Columbia River, the issue of transporting the volatile material across environmentally sensitive areas in the Pacific Northwest moved to front and center in the public debate. Leah Nash NYT