Gary Reidt, right, peels back house wrap to show off the earthquake ties that have been installed in a garage that was under construction east of Puyallup in 2001. Washington is vulnerable to some of the planet’s most powerful subduction-zone earthquakes and tsunamis, as well as quakes on shallow faults like the one that runs under Seattle. The more people who hold earthquake insurance, the lower the financial hit from a major quake and the quicker the region will be able to bounce back.
Gary Reidt, right, peels back house wrap to show off the earthquake ties that have been installed in a garage that was under construction east of Puyallup in 2001. Washington is vulnerable to some of the planet’s most powerful subduction-zone earthquakes and tsunamis, as well as quakes on shallow faults like the one that runs under Seattle. The more people who hold earthquake insurance, the lower the financial hit from a major quake and the quicker the region will be able to bounce back. Janet Jensen McClatchy file
Gary Reidt, right, peels back house wrap to show off the earthquake ties that have been installed in a garage that was under construction east of Puyallup in 2001. Washington is vulnerable to some of the planet’s most powerful subduction-zone earthquakes and tsunamis, as well as quakes on shallow faults like the one that runs under Seattle. The more people who hold earthquake insurance, the lower the financial hit from a major quake and the quicker the region will be able to bounce back. Janet Jensen McClatchy file

Earthquake insurance is key to recovery, but just 11 percent have it in Washington

February 07, 2018 08:13 AM