Riders board the No. 70 bus at the University of Washington bus transfer station. Seattle’s busiest bus line, the RapidRide E, carries just under 18,000 daily passengers up and down Aurora Avenue. Buses arrive at each stop about 115 times per day. Vancouver, B.C., has 11 separate bus lines that carry more people than the E. As the Seattle region embarks on its own multi-decade light-rail expansion, Metro Vancouver provides one glimpse of what a regional rail system could look like, with bus, housing and land-use plans to match.
Riders board the No. 70 bus at the University of Washington bus transfer station. Seattle’s busiest bus line, the RapidRide E, carries just under 18,000 daily passengers up and down Aurora Avenue. Buses arrive at each stop about 115 times per day. Vancouver, B.C., has 11 separate bus lines that carry more people than the E. As the Seattle region embarks on its own multi-decade light-rail expansion, Metro Vancouver provides one glimpse of what a regional rail system could look like, with bus, housing and land-use plans to match. Ellen M. Banner TNS file
Riders board the No. 70 bus at the University of Washington bus transfer station. Seattle’s busiest bus line, the RapidRide E, carries just under 18,000 daily passengers up and down Aurora Avenue. Buses arrive at each stop about 115 times per day. Vancouver, B.C., has 11 separate bus lines that carry more people than the E. As the Seattle region embarks on its own multi-decade light-rail expansion, Metro Vancouver provides one glimpse of what a regional rail system could look like, with bus, housing and land-use plans to match. Ellen M. Banner TNS file

Is this Seattle’s transit future? A look at Vancouver, B.C. – a city that figured it out

April 23, 2018 02:09 PM