Monitors are attached to Tucker, an olive ridley sea turtle being rehabbed at the Seattle Aquarium, before he’s subjected to a pressure that’s equivalent to a depth of 60 feet to help dissolve bubbles believed to be trapped in his gastrointestinal system, on March 28, 2016, at the Virginia Mason Center for Hyperbaric Medicine.
Monitors are attached to Tucker, an olive ridley sea turtle being rehabbed at the Seattle Aquarium, before he’s subjected to a pressure that’s equivalent to a depth of 60 feet to help dissolve bubbles believed to be trapped in his gastrointestinal system, on March 28, 2016, at the Virginia Mason Center for Hyperbaric Medicine. Alan Berner Seattle Times
Monitors are attached to Tucker, an olive ridley sea turtle being rehabbed at the Seattle Aquarium, before he’s subjected to a pressure that’s equivalent to a depth of 60 feet to help dissolve bubbles believed to be trapped in his gastrointestinal system, on March 28, 2016, at the Virginia Mason Center for Hyperbaric Medicine. Alan Berner Seattle Times