Northwest News

So running with the bulls isn’t your brand of fun; how about swimming with the orcas?

In this photo taken July 31, 2015, An orca whale breaches in view of Mount Baker in July 2015 in the Salish Sea in the San Juan Islands.
In this photo taken July 31, 2015, An orca whale breaches in view of Mount Baker in July 2015 in the Salish Sea in the San Juan Islands. Associated Press

A holiday weekend excursion at Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver, B.C., became a black and white affair, the Vanouver Sun reported, as a couple of swimmers unexpectedly were joined by a pod of orca.

Photographer Robin Leveille captured video of at least three orcas charging toward two swimmers, who quickly scrambled out of the water an onto the rocky beach seconds before one orca comes within feet of the shore. Leveille posted the video to his Instgram account. (Warning: The video contains strong language.)

 

A whale of a good time here at Whytecliff Park today.

A post shared by Robin Léveillé (@robin_leveille) on

Whytecliff Park is well-known for its beach, views and wildlife, though encounters with orcas are rare, according to the Sun.

While southern resident killer whales – orca that live in the Salish Sea (J, K and L pods) – are known to feed on salmon, the diet of some transient orca pods include small mammals, such as harbor seals that are known to frequent the area. Neither resident nor transient orcas are known for attacking humans, though.

In fact, according to an article on whalefacts.org, there has only been one confirmed case of a killer whale attack on a human in the wild, and that occurred 45 years ago in 1972.

A 2011 article on kqed.org, states that orca have been known to be selective in what they eat, but it’s not really known why humans don’t seem to be an orca delicacy.

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