Elections

Trump on fundraising: ‘I’d like support’ but can go it alone

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he speaks in Las Vegas on Saturday, June 18, 2016. Trump’s campaign is cycling $6 million into his companies through use of his properties; meanwhile, Trump has been on an urgent fundraising quest.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he speaks in Las Vegas on Saturday, June 18, 2016. Trump’s campaign is cycling $6 million into his companies through use of his properties; meanwhile, Trump has been on an urgent fundraising quest. Associated Press

Donald Trump shrugged off concerns about his meager fundraising totals Tuesday, expressing confidence that he could inject his presidential campaign with as much cash as needed and hitting his opponent, Hillary Clinton, as a big-spending politician who is beholden to Wall Street.

The comments came hours after campaign finance filings showed that Clinton’s campaign war chest dwarfs that of the Manhattan businessman by more than $40 million. His cash on hand total was a paltry $1.3 million, which Trump attributed to lingering reluctance among Republicans to rally around his candidacy.

“It would be nice to have some help from the party,” Trump said on NBC’s “Today” show. “I’d like to see great support. If I don’t have great support I’ll go a different route.”

The different direction would be self-funding his general election bid, as Trump did, to a certain extent, during the primary campaign.

“I have a lot of cash and I may do that in the general election,” he said.

Still, Trump defended his fundraising prowess and said that he collected $12 million for the Republican Party’s coffers during a series of events over the weekend. Despite those efforts, Trump lamented that he was not getting more support from his own side.

“I’m having more difficulty, frankly, with some of the people in the party than I am with some of the Democrats,” he said. “They don’t want to come on. They will probably eventually come on. If they don’t, I’ll be fine either way.”

Trump also suggested that fundraising is less important for him because of the unusual nature of his candidacy. Drawing on the experience of his primary campaign, in which his opponents outspent him and lost, Trump said it would not require $1 billion to beat Clinton.

“Politicians are the only ones who can spend a billion dollars,” Trump said in a separate interview on Fox News. “Hillary Clinton will spend a billion dollars of Wall Street money and the money from the Middle East.”

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