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As sure as the nose on his face, it's been 10 years since he first broke a world record

That time he set a world record blowing up balloons with his nose

Andrew Dahl, then 14, set a new Guinness World Record on April 11, 2008 by blowing up 213 balloons with his nose at the Blaine Public Library. In September of that same year, he broke his own record on "Live with Regis and Kelly" with 308 balloons.
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Andrew Dahl, then 14, set a new Guinness World Record on April 11, 2008 by blowing up 213 balloons with his nose at the Blaine Public Library. In September of that same year, he broke his own record on "Live with Regis and Kelly" with 308 balloons.

It's been 10 years since Andrew Dahl set his first Guinness World Record as a teenager, but you could say he still has a nose for it.

You may recall the "Balloon Boy." The 13-year-old from Blaine set a world record on April 11, 2008 for the number of balloons inflated in an hour — using only his nose.

Dahl inflated 213 balloons that day, and five months later broke his own record, inflating 308 while on "Live with Regis and Kelly."

After 10 years, "Balloon Boy" is all grown up.

He just finished moving to Tehachapi, California, where he will put his nose to the grindstone and start a job Monday as an aerospace engineer at Scaled Composites.

He no longer holds the record, nor another one he once held for most balloons inflated with his nose in three minutes. Both were eclipsed by serial record breaker Ashrita Furman, who has a website listing the 46 records he's held, dubbing himself "Mr. Versatility."

0411 Balloon boy1.JPG
Andrew Dahl, then 13, of Blaine, inflates a balloon with his nose as his father, Doug Dahl, measures it during a Guinness World Record attempt at the Blaine Library on April 11, 2008. Tuesday marks the 10-year anniversary since Andrew broke his first Guinness World Record, using his nose to inflate 213 balloons in an hour. Staff The Bellingham Herald file

Talk about a guy that has his nose in a little bit of everything.

Furman inflated 28 balloons in the three-minute sprint event in December 2013 and an impressive 671 in the hour-long marathon category a month later.

"At first, it was a little disappointing to lose the record," Dahl said in a phone interview Tuesday. "But then I got thinking it's pretty cool that other people are trying. It's not a competition if you're the only one doing it."

And this competition is not over until the last balloon, as Dahl said he wouldn't mind giving it another try.

"I think from time to time that I definitely want to get the records back," said Dahl, who first broke the three-minute record with 23 inflated balloons.

While he and Furman have traded the three-minute record a few times, it was the hour-long attempt that earned Dahl his first whiff of fame.

His initial attempt at the hour-long record was rejected when somebody got their nose bent out of shape because he didn't tie all the balloons, as the rules required.

But he hit it on the nose that April day at the Blaine Public Library, making sure every balloon was knotted properly, even though tying the balloons ended up giving him blisters on his hands.

Ah, the price of fame. His pain was rewarded a few months later, when he got a letter confirming he was the new record holder.

"Even though it was something kind of silly, it was cool to say that you were the best in the world at something," Dahl said.

0411 Balloon boy2.JPG
Andrew Dahl, 13, of Blaine, center, lifts his arms into the air after spending 60 minutes inflating balloons with his nose as his mother, Wendy Dahl, left, and father, Doug Dahl, help document it as a Guinness World Record attempt at the Blaine Library on April 11, 2008. Staff The Bellingham Herald file


Though he's not currently the record holder, Dahl said he still occasionally gets asked to show off his unusual skill.

"I'll show friends if they ask — and if they have balloons," Dahl joked.

He also has some great stories to tell. In addition to the trip to New York City for the attempt on "Live with Regis and Kelly," Dahl also was flown to Rome and Istanbul, Turkey, to make attempts at the three-minute record.

"I never imagined I would have gotten to go there," Dahl said. "It's this little trick, but it allowed me to have some opportunities I wouldn't have otherwise had."

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