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Video tour gives sneak peek inside Bellingham’s Granary Building

Get a sneak peek at renovations at the Granary Building

The renovated Granary Building on Bellingham’s waterfront is taking shape as Harcourt Development builds restaurant and office space in the former home of the Washington Egg and Poultry Cooperative Association.
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The renovated Granary Building on Bellingham’s waterfront is taking shape as Harcourt Development builds restaurant and office space in the former home of the Washington Egg and Poultry Cooperative Association.

Once a distribution center for eggs and chicken feed – and, in recent years, pigeons – the Granary Building on Bellingham’s waterfront is taking shape as Harcourt Development builds restaurant and office space.

A new video posted on the City of Bellingham’s YouTube page shows progress on the extensive makeover of the building, built in 1929 for the Washington Egg and Poultry Cooperative Association.

Part history lesson and part sales pitch – in one scene, Harcourt’s Louis Parr calls the seventh-floor cupola “the most fantastic office in the world” – the video shows the work necessary to cut through 10 grain silos inside the building.

Four retail spaces will be located on the ground floor along Central Avenue, with the upper levels available as office space. The makeover will incorporate the historic wooden texture of the walls with views of Bellingham Bay, as work crews cut new windows into the hardened Douglas fir walls, some of them built with 2-by-8 lumber.

Harcourt bought the building for $200,000 as part of a 2015 agreement with the Port that outlines the first steps for the redevelopment of the waterfront. It’s due to be completed in 2019.

The city plans to build the two arterial streets through the waterfront – Granary Avenue and Laurel Street – and is also working to create a new waterfront park along Whatcom Waterway, where Whatcom Creek empties into the bay. Bids on the street construction are due Sept. 13.

The new park, called Waypoint Park, will include a reimagined acid ball salvaged from the former Georgia-Pacific pulp and paper mill on the site. The park is scheduled to open to the public in 2018.

Jim Donaldson: 360-715-2288

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