Local

Sunny skies, cold temperatures forecast for the week

Haggen grocery store clerk Lacey Starkovich collects carts during the cold weather in Ferndale. Starkovich says she stays warm by wearing lots of layers and warming up inside between trips.
Haggen grocery store clerk Lacey Starkovich collects carts during the cold weather in Ferndale. Starkovich says she stays warm by wearing lots of layers and warming up inside between trips. pdwyer@bhamherald.com

This past weekend’s snow will linger on the ground for at least the next several days as a frigid blast from British Columbia will keep temperatures below freezing this week.

Clear skies are forecast through at least Thursday night as high pressure opens the door for what meteorologists call the “Fraser outflow” to pour into Northwest Washington. Daytime high temperatures will hover around 30 degrees, with overnight lows in the teens and 20s.

“It’s flowing that cold, dry air out of the Fraser Valley,” said meteorologist Johnny Burg at the National Weather Service in Seattle. “It’ll be sunny, but it’ll also be cold.”

An advisory was issued overnight Sunday for strong winds from the north-northeast. A handful of brief power outages were reported Sunday night in northwestern Whatcom County on social media posts, and a few outages remained about noon Monday in northern Whatcom County, according to the Puget Sound Energy online outage map.

Fewer than 100 customers were affected Monday. Several trees fell over roadways in northwestern Whatcom County, where winds were the strongest.

At Bellingham International Airport, a gust of 43 mph was recorded at 9:53 p.m. Sunday, with sustained winds at 25 mph. A gust of 51 mph was recorded at 8:53 a.m. Monday, with sustained winds of 29 mph.

Burg said windy conditions will persist for several days, with winds about 15 to 20 mph, adding a sharp bite to the air.

“It’s going to be breezy until at least Wednesday,” he said. “It’ll gradually warm up by Friday. There’s a chance of rain or snow Friday night, Saturday. Rain looks likely by Sunday.”

Daytime high temperatures will return to a more seasonable mid-40s by Sunday, Burg said.

For backcountry sports enthusiasts, the avalanche danger remained considerable Monday above the treeline on the western slopes of the North Cascades. The danger level was moderate near and below the treeline, according to the Northwest Avalanche Center.

Conditions were clear Monday morning at the Mt. Baker Ski Area, with a 114-inch base at Heather Meadows and a 161-inch base at the higher Pan Dome.

Robert Mittendorf: 360-756-2805, @BhamMitty

  Comments