FILE - In this undated file photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, NOAA researchers pour a sample of sea water containing a brownish toxic algae into a jar aboard a research vessel off the Washington Coast. A new study finds that unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures helped cause a massive toxic algae bloom last year that closed lucrative fisheries from California to British Columbia and disrupted marine life from seabirds to sea lions, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. Scientists linked the patch of warm ocean water, nicknamed the “blob,” to the vast ribbon of toxic algae that flourished in 2015.
FILE - In this undated file photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, NOAA researchers pour a sample of sea water containing a brownish toxic algae into a jar aboard a research vessel off the Washington Coast. A new study finds that unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures helped cause a massive toxic algae bloom last year that closed lucrative fisheries from California to British Columbia and disrupted marine life from seabirds to sea lions, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. Scientists linked the patch of warm ocean water, nicknamed the “blob,” to the vast ribbon of toxic algae that flourished in 2015. NOAA Fisheries AP
FILE - In this undated file photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, NOAA researchers pour a sample of sea water containing a brownish toxic algae into a jar aboard a research vessel off the Washington Coast. A new study finds that unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures helped cause a massive toxic algae bloom last year that closed lucrative fisheries from California to British Columbia and disrupted marine life from seabirds to sea lions, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. Scientists linked the patch of warm ocean water, nicknamed the “blob,” to the vast ribbon of toxic algae that flourished in 2015. NOAA Fisheries AP

Warm ‘blob’ in Pacific Ocean linked to toxic algae that doomed local fisheries

September 29, 2016 05:40 PM