Living

WWU

Kady Seward, 18, left, from Auburn, sits in Red Square at Western Washington University with her parents, George and Jan Seward, as she waits for her 
Summer Start Freshman Orientation advising session Aug. 18. The square includes Fisher Fountain, and Isamu Noguchi’s Skyviewing Sculpture, visible behind the family.
Kady Seward, 18, left, from Auburn, sits in Red Square at Western Washington University with her parents, George and Jan Seward, as she waits for her Summer Start Freshman Orientation advising session Aug. 18. The square includes Fisher Fountain, and Isamu Noguchi’s Skyviewing Sculpture, visible behind the family. NIKI DESAUTELS THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

OVERVIEW

Western Washington University neighborhood encompasses the four-year state university. Western has about 13,000 students, of whom about 3,800 live on campus.

Western consistently receives high marks for its excellence and affordability, and is a leading local employer, with nearly 1,500 workers.

The main campus covers 195 acres, including Sehome Hill Arboretum, a popular hiking spot. The campus has undergone a building boom in recent years, with several new buildings, including a student recreation center on south campus.

For non-students, attractions include the many plays, sporting events, exhibits, concerts and lectures presented on campus, plus Western’s acclaimed collection of outdoor sculpture.

HISTORY

In 1893, Gov. John H. McGraw signed legislation establishing New Whatcom State Normal School. Old Main was built three years later to hold classrooms, offices and a library, but funding fell short and the school didn’t open until 1899.

SCHOOL

Western Washington University.

PARKS

Sehome Hill Arboretum, Laurel, Pine and Cedar, Connelly Creek Trail.

QUOTE

“Being around students makes for an invigorating atmosphere. There’s always something going on.”

Carole Morris, assistant to the associate dean of Woodring College of Education

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