Living

Fairhaven

Riley Anderson, 3, sticks his face in water being sprayed by sister Mattingly, 5, during a visit to Fairhaven Village Green. The square in the historic district provides space for concerts, festivals, outdoor movies and a farmers market. Other times, people quietly enjoy the benches and grassy area.
Riley Anderson, 3, sticks his face in water being sprayed by sister Mattingly, 5, during a visit to Fairhaven Village Green. The square in the historic district provides space for concerts, festivals, outdoor movies and a farmers market. Other times, people quietly enjoy the benches and grassy area. PHILIP A. DWYER THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

OVERVIEW

This historic neighborhood was one of four original towns to arise on Bellingham Bay. Fairhaven’s boom during the 1890s left a legacy of turn-of-the-century brick buildings that now house a flourishing commercial and tourist district.

The area is growing, with several new apartment and condominium buildings.

Fairhaven is home to numerous community events, many based at the Village Green. District events include the It All Ends in Fairhaven street fair during the Ski to Sea Race each Memorial Day weekend.

HISTORY

Standing where Bellingham Cruise Terminal is now located, Pacific American Fisheries was the largest Pacific salmon cannery in the world, with its heyday in the first quarter of the 20th century.

SCHOOLS

Lowell Elementary, Larrabee Elementary, Fairhaven Middle, Sehome High.

District: Bellingham School District, www.bham.wednet.edu.

PARKS

Marine, Village Green, Fairhaven.

QUOTE

“Fairhaven is a unique neighborhood. It has more ingredients of an urban village than any other neighborhood. We are concerned about planning for the future and maintaining and expanding on some of its historical strengths.”

Ralph Thacker, neighborhood resident who is researching Dirty Dan Harris, Fairhaven’s founder

  Comments