Entertainment

Artist Profile: East County guitarist Hambone Wilson celebrates release of new CD

Blues, rock and Americana guitarist Thayer “Hambone” Wilson (who sometimes goes by “Chris”) celebrates the release of his latest self-titled CD at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 4, at the Green Frog, 1015 N. State St.

He’s joined by some of the musicians who are on the recording, including Dave Stone on Hammond B3 organ, “Dr.” Jimmy Lindquist on bass, Wedge Michaels on drums, and Alfie “Harpo” Barranco on harmonica. Cover is $5.

Because Wilson lives in East Whatcom County (in the small burg of Welcome), he’s offering rides from the county on the Baker Ski Bus from Glacier to Bellingham. The cost is $15, and includes both the ride and the show. For details, call Paul at 360-599-3115. There’s limited seating, says Wilson, so call ahead for stops and times.

If you miss the gig at the Green Frog, catch him at one of places he plays frequently, the Little Roadside Tavern at Nugents Corner in Deming, at 8 p.m. April 18.

For more about Wilson go, to hambonewilson.com.

Question: What brought you to Whatcom County?

Answer: I came to visit Whatcom County in the spring of 1999 to boat Racehorse Creek off North Fork Road near Deming. I was 28, actively paddling white water across the United States, and Racehorse Creek had yet to be descended by me, which I did that spring.

I’d been living in West Virginia and after I graduated from West Virginia University in July 1999 I decided to give music a break, and move west to the town of Glacier.

Q: What inspires you in your songwriting?

A: I find inspiration to write music from my daily life, family relationships, nature, and the things I’ve seen along the way. Sometimes a song will come from 10 years ago, and sometimes it will come in a day. Some ideas work into songs over a long period of time. I don’t have a formula, ideas come when they are ready.

When I am writing songs I do try to keep them short and to the point. This is different than my live shows, where I find a lot of freedom to play to the energy in the song.

Q: Any embarrassing gigs?

A: An awkward moment was playing The Avalon Nudist Resort in Paw Paw, W. Va. The attendance was 800 or so souls, all buck-naked. When in Rome, be like the Romans. I was 29 at the time. That was the last gig I played in 1999 on the East Coast; it was a kind of kiss your grits goodbye.

Q: Where do you play locally?

A: The Little Roadside for the last 13 years is always a good show. It has been a musical home for me in Whatcom County.

I’ve hosted guests monthly, including international blues musician Wes Mackey, B.B. King’s former bassist Russell Jackson, Billy Stoops, Nick Vigarino, Country Dave, Evan Johns, Dan Lowinger, Stell Newsome, Jeff Gray, Johnny Brewer, Arsen Shomakhoff, Dave Stone, Delvon, and recently some surprise guests from West Virginia, The Davisson Brothers, with current country hit No. 66 on the billboard charts.

I don’t play open mikes often, but I do enjoy playing with others. Sometimes I play as a three-piece with my longtime friends and players Dr. Jimmy on bass and Wedge on drums. I also really like to blend into other bands, playing off of others. It really depends on the venue and situation. More than anything it’s the constraints of the venue and what the job requires.

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