Op-Ed

Op-Ed

Rediscovering America: A quiz for Memorial Day

Memorial Day is a national holiday that honors the men and women of the armed forces who sacrificed their lives while serving our country.

Op-Ed

Helping to save lives through education, awareness and empowerment of mental illness

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. It is a time when people with mental illness speak out about their persistent struggles and journeys of resilience. People with mental health challenges must face the symptoms and ramifications of their illnesses, while also facing society’s misunderstandings and stigmatization. Stereotypes wrongly devalue people with mental illness, leaving many to contend with their deep despair alone.

Op-Ed

Here’s why funding public education and research funds America’s future

Federal funding for education and research has been critical to America’s competitiveness and innovativeness. The recent budget blueprint released by the Trump administration projects deep cuts to several student aid programs. Access to post-secondary education is even more critical at this time, according to Sabah Randhawa, president of Western Washington University in Bellingham, Wash.

Op-Ed

Mayor: Fast-growing Ferndale ‘open for business’

Ferndale is one of Washington’s fastest growing cities and it’s hard to keep track of all that’s happening. To help, here’s the inside scoop on all things Ferndale – starting with the four values that serve as the pillars of my administration: safety, transparency, efficiency and community.

Op-Ed

How Trump can make Obamacare work without changing the law

Two independent groups have recently opined that Obamacare is not in the death spiral that the president and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., claim to foresee. But the Trump administration and Congress have the power to make that prediction come true. They simply have to initiate – or, in the case of Section 1402, continue – a series of below-the-radar steps that could cripple Obamacare.

Op-Ed

Trump’s arts cuts save .002 percent. We lose much more in community building

Cutting the National Endowment for the Humanities and National Endowment for the Arts would reduce the federal budget by .002 percent and that tiny savings pales in comparison to what we would lose as a community, state, nation and people. The National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts, while based in Washington, D.C., are present in and a very vital part of the local cultural and educational ecosystem in Washington state, Whatcom County and Bellingham.

Op-Ed

What issues will matter to Trump’s base of support?

For all the things low-information voters supportive of President Donald Trump are not supposed to care about (e.g., lies, White House chaos, foreign policy), there are, it’s fair to say, two things that will make a difference to them both in preference and turnout in 2018. The good news for Democrats is that both factors do not weigh in Trump’s favor.

Op-Ed

Washington state can spend $1.9 million now, or $100 million later on these invaders

Today, however, there is a bill in front of the state legislature that could provide both economic development and environmental benefits. Aquatic invasive species called zebra and quagga mussels are threatening our waterways and have the potential to cost Washington state taxpayers their access to clean water and millions of dollars in lost revenue by causing irreparable harm to our lakes, rivers and the Salish Sea.

Op-Ed

As a doctor, I see how a lack of health insurance worsens illness and suffering

Congressional leaders and the president-elect have vowed to overturn the Affordable Care Act, which, despite its imperfections, gave 22 million Americans greater health security. As a physician and a citizen, I ask only this of the new Congress and next administration: Whatever path you choose – whether to repeal, replace or refine the ACA – pledge that no patient who has health insurance today will lose it tomorrow.

Videos

Highlights from the 2017 Blossomtime Parade

Marching bands, fire trucks and horses, as well as law enforcement vehicles, dance troupes, clowns, the Bellingham SeaHawkers and community walking groups entertained the crowd during the 2017 Blossomtime Parade Saturday, May 27th in Bellingham. The parade honored Whatcom Community College's 50th anniversary. The parade tradition began in 1920, was revived in 1947 as the Blossomtime Parade, which changed to the Ski to Sea Grand Parade, and then back to Blossomtime over the years.
Highlights from the 2017 Blossomtime Parade 2:21

Highlights from the 2017 Blossomtime Parade

Have you seen the low tides this week around Bellingham? 1:12

Have you seen the low tides this week around Bellingham?

Five things to know about Ski to Sea heading into Memorial Day weekend 1:07

Five things to know about Ski to Sea heading into Memorial Day weekend

10 historical facts about Fairhaven 2:02

10 historical facts about Fairhaven