Jerald Brooks, left, one of the original participants in a Seattle program called Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, goes shopping for groceries March 25 with Chris Cates, his caseworker, in Seattle. Funding from the expansion of Medicaid brought on by Obamacare in some states has made repeat drug offenders such as Brooks eligible for coverage, which could be a new tool for shifting addicts out of the criminal-justice system as an alternative to the drug war.
Jerald Brooks, left, one of the original participants in a Seattle program called Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, goes shopping for groceries March 25 with Chris Cates, his caseworker, in Seattle. Funding from the expansion of Medicaid brought on by Obamacare in some states has made repeat drug offenders such as Brooks eligible for coverage, which could be a new tool for shifting addicts out of the criminal-justice system as an alternative to the drug war. Ted S. Warren AP
Jerald Brooks, left, one of the original participants in a Seattle program called Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, goes shopping for groceries March 25 with Chris Cates, his caseworker, in Seattle. Funding from the expansion of Medicaid brought on by Obamacare in some states has made repeat drug offenders such as Brooks eligible for coverage, which could be a new tool for shifting addicts out of the criminal-justice system as an alternative to the drug war. Ted S. Warren AP

Low-level drug offenders find new source of addiction help

April 11, 2016 02:20 PM