From right, University of Washington professor John Marzluff, graduate student Loma Pendergraft and research technician Marcella Cline sedate a crow on Dec. 16, 2015, before the bird’s brain is scanned at the University of Washington’s medical center in Seattle. The crow was part of research inspecting the bird’s brain activity at the sight of food. UW research has shown crows can recognize individual faces, and pass down through generations whether that face is friend or foe. A recent experiment found that crows are also keen observers of death.
From right, University of Washington professor John Marzluff, graduate student Loma Pendergraft and research technician Marcella Cline sedate a crow on Dec. 16, 2015, before the bird’s brain is scanned at the University of Washington’s medical center in Seattle. The crow was part of research inspecting the bird’s brain activity at the sight of food. UW research has shown crows can recognize individual faces, and pass down through generations whether that face is friend or foe. A recent experiment found that crows are also keen observers of death. Manuel Valdes Associated Press
From right, University of Washington professor John Marzluff, graduate student Loma Pendergraft and research technician Marcella Cline sedate a crow on Dec. 16, 2015, before the bird’s brain is scanned at the University of Washington’s medical center in Seattle. The crow was part of research inspecting the bird’s brain activity at the sight of food. UW research has shown crows can recognize individual faces, and pass down through generations whether that face is friend or foe. A recent experiment found that crows are also keen observers of death. Manuel Valdes Associated Press

In death, a crow’s big brain fires up memory, learning

March 17, 2016 11:28 AM