A protester carries a sign on a trail on Burnaby Mountain near where work is being done by Kinder Morgan in preparation for the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project in Burnaby, B.C., in 2014. The proposed $5-billion expansion would nearly triple the capacity of the pipeline that carries crude oil from near Edmonton to the Vancouver area to be loaded on tankers. This week, George Heyman, Environment and Climate Change Strategy Minister, said the company may not move forward on public lands until it completes consultations with First Nations on several environmental aspects of the project not yet addressed.
A protester carries a sign on a trail on Burnaby Mountain near where work is being done by Kinder Morgan in preparation for the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project in Burnaby, B.C., in 2014. The proposed $5-billion expansion would nearly triple the capacity of the pipeline that carries crude oil from near Edmonton to the Vancouver area to be loaded on tankers. This week, George Heyman, Environment and Climate Change Strategy Minister, said the company may not move forward on public lands until it completes consultations with First Nations on several environmental aspects of the project not yet addressed. Darryl Dyck The Canadian Press file
A protester carries a sign on a trail on Burnaby Mountain near where work is being done by Kinder Morgan in preparation for the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project in Burnaby, B.C., in 2014. The proposed $5-billion expansion would nearly triple the capacity of the pipeline that carries crude oil from near Edmonton to the Vancouver area to be loaded on tankers. This week, George Heyman, Environment and Climate Change Strategy Minister, said the company may not move forward on public lands until it completes consultations with First Nations on several environmental aspects of the project not yet addressed. Darryl Dyck The Canadian Press file

British Columbia moves to block Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

August 11, 2017 12:11 PM

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