Rose Nelson stands on the porch of the Parkland-area rental home she said squatters used over six weeks in 2015 and 2016, causing $21,000 dollars in damage. Nelson said she was told by Pierce County Sheriff’s deputies that they couldn’t evict the squatters because it was a civil matter. A bill signed into law Wednesday aims to make it easier for property owners to evict squatters.
Rose Nelson stands on the porch of the Parkland-area rental home she said squatters used over six weeks in 2015 and 2016, causing $21,000 dollars in damage. Nelson said she was told by Pierce County Sheriff’s deputies that they couldn’t evict the squatters because it was a civil matter. A bill signed into law Wednesday aims to make it easier for property owners to evict squatters. Dean J. Koepfler dean.koepfler@thenewstribune.com
Rose Nelson stands on the porch of the Parkland-area rental home she said squatters used over six weeks in 2015 and 2016, causing $21,000 dollars in damage. Nelson said she was told by Pierce County Sheriff’s deputies that they couldn’t evict the squatters because it was a civil matter. A bill signed into law Wednesday aims to make it easier for property owners to evict squatters. Dean J. Koepfler dean.koepfler@thenewstribune.com

A new law could help prevent the ‘extended nightmare’ of squatters

May 13, 2017 08:00 AM

UPDATED May 19, 2017 08:29 PM

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