A row of tiny houses at a homeless encampment stand in view of a full-size home behind, in Seattle. Tiny homes could be the solution to all kinds of housing needs, offering warmth and security for the homeless, an affordable option for expensive big cities and simplicity for people who want to declutter their lives. However, that seemingly broad support fails to translate into acceptance when tiny home developers try to build next door.
A row of tiny houses at a homeless encampment stand in view of a full-size home behind, in Seattle. Tiny homes could be the solution to all kinds of housing needs, offering warmth and security for the homeless, an affordable option for expensive big cities and simplicity for people who want to declutter their lives. However, that seemingly broad support fails to translate into acceptance when tiny home developers try to build next door. Elaine Thompson AP file
A row of tiny houses at a homeless encampment stand in view of a full-size home behind, in Seattle. Tiny homes could be the solution to all kinds of housing needs, offering warmth and security for the homeless, an affordable option for expensive big cities and simplicity for people who want to declutter their lives. However, that seemingly broad support fails to translate into acceptance when tiny home developers try to build next door. Elaine Thompson AP file

Tiny houses are trendy – unless they go up next door

November 15, 2017 08:07 AM

UPDATED November 14, 2017 04:10 PM

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