The North Dakota National Guard directs traffic in Morton County, where thousands of Native Americans have joined the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s protest against an oil pipeline, in Bismarck, N.D., Sept. 6, 2016. Ranchers and residents in the conservative, overwhelmingly white countryside view the demonstrations with a mix of frustration and fear, reflecting the deep cultural divides and racial attitudes.
The North Dakota National Guard directs traffic in Morton County, where thousands of Native Americans have joined the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s protest against an oil pipeline, in Bismarck, N.D., Sept. 6, 2016. Ranchers and residents in the conservative, overwhelmingly white countryside view the demonstrations with a mix of frustration and fear, reflecting the deep cultural divides and racial attitudes. Alyssa Schukar NYT
The North Dakota National Guard directs traffic in Morton County, where thousands of Native Americans have joined the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s protest against an oil pipeline, in Bismarck, N.D., Sept. 6, 2016. Ranchers and residents in the conservative, overwhelmingly white countryside view the demonstrations with a mix of frustration and fear, reflecting the deep cultural divides and racial attitudes. Alyssa Schukar NYT

Neighbors say Standing Rock pipeline protests are disrupting lives, livelihoods

September 13, 2016 04:20 PM