"Ewww, it's slimy," Lainie Mueller said as she picked up her squid during a science lesson in Veronica Binkley's kindergarten class at Lowell Elementary School. The students studied their squid before dissecting them with adult helpers April 23, 2008. The activity was part of an under-the-sea science unit that exposed the children to the process of scientific observation. "Children learn best through discovery and hands-on learning," Binkley said. The children are learning about three categories of sea animals: invertebrates, fish and mammals. "I learned that squid eyes feel disgusting," Mueller said after the exercise.
"Ewww, it's slimy," Lainie Mueller said as she picked up her squid during a science lesson in Veronica Binkley's kindergarten class at Lowell Elementary School. The students studied their squid before dissecting them with adult helpers April 23, 2008. The activity was part of an under-the-sea science unit that exposed the children to the process of scientific observation. "Children learn best through discovery and hands-on learning," Binkley said. The children are learning about three categories of sea animals: invertebrates, fish and mammals. "I learned that squid eyes feel disgusting," Mueller said after the exercise. JOSIE LIMING THE BELLINGHAM HERALD
"Ewww, it's slimy," Lainie Mueller said as she picked up her squid during a science lesson in Veronica Binkley's kindergarten class at Lowell Elementary School. The students studied their squid before dissecting them with adult helpers April 23, 2008. The activity was part of an under-the-sea science unit that exposed the children to the process of scientific observation. "Children learn best through discovery and hands-on learning," Binkley said. The children are learning about three categories of sea animals: invertebrates, fish and mammals. "I learned that squid eyes feel disgusting," Mueller said after the exercise. JOSIE LIMING THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

Bellingham schools may cut back jobs, programs to save money

February 02, 2010 6:05 AM