Tim Bento of Lynden grills deer meat he obtained as roadkill along a highway near his home on July 18, 2017. Last July, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission changed state code to allow the salvage of elk and deer accidentally killed by vehicles. In the program’s first year of existence, people plucked nearly 1,600 deer and elk off Washington roadways, according to a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife database of permits required for salvage.
Tim Bento of Lynden grills deer meat he obtained as roadkill along a highway near his home on July 18, 2017. Last July, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission changed state code to allow the salvage of elk and deer accidentally killed by vehicles. In the program’s first year of existence, people plucked nearly 1,600 deer and elk off Washington roadways, according to a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife database of permits required for salvage. Mike Siegel The Seattle Times
Tim Bento of Lynden grills deer meat he obtained as roadkill along a highway near his home on July 18, 2017. Last July, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission changed state code to allow the salvage of elk and deer accidentally killed by vehicles. In the program’s first year of existence, people plucked nearly 1,600 deer and elk off Washington roadways, according to a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife database of permits required for salvage. Mike Siegel The Seattle Times

Lynden man takes advantage of state’s new roadkill law to feed his family

July 26, 2017 01:02 PM