This March 2018 photo shows Kristina Olson in her laboratory in Seattle. She is the creator and leader of the TransYouth Project, which is considered the first large-scale long-term study of transgender children in the U.S. On Thursday, April 12, 2018, Olson was named winner of the NSF's annual Alan T. Waterman Award, the government's highest honor for scientists still in the early phases of their careers.
This March 2018 photo shows Kristina Olson in her laboratory in Seattle. She is the creator and leader of the TransYouth Project, which is considered the first large-scale long-term study of transgender children in the U.S. On Thursday, April 12, 2018, Olson was named winner of the NSF's annual Alan T. Waterman Award, the government's highest honor for scientists still in the early phases of their careers. University of Washington via AP Dennis Wise
This March 2018 photo shows Kristina Olson in her laboratory in Seattle. She is the creator and leader of the TransYouth Project, which is considered the first large-scale long-term study of transgender children in the U.S. On Thursday, April 12, 2018, Olson was named winner of the NSF's annual Alan T. Waterman Award, the government's highest honor for scientists still in the early phases of their careers. University of Washington via AP Dennis Wise

$1 million federal grant will help study of transgender kids

April 12, 2018 11:47 AM