Accused Bellingham bike thief also broke into cars, police say

THE BELLINGHAM HERALDFebruary 5, 2014 

BELLINGHAM - The charges are piling up against a man accused of stealing more than $8,000 in bikes, as police say he is admitting to several vehicle prowls that occurred in the area.

Devyn V. Juvonen, 23, was arrested Feb. 3 on suspicion of first-degree theft of five bicycles on Erie Street after he dropped a backpack containing items that linked him to the crime, but that may just be the tip of the iceberg, Bellingham Police Lt. Bob Vander Yacht said.

When questioned by police, Juvonen admitted to four vehicle prowls within the last month, Vander Yacht said. He broke into the vehicles and stole expensive items, Vander Yacht said.

A camera and a car stereo system were stolen from two different vehicles on Erie Street Feb. 2, the same night of the bike thefts. Police say Juvonen admitted stealing those items as well as a Dell laptop computer from a vehicle in mid-January on Undine Street. Another vehicle was prowled around the same time on Erie Street, but nothing expensive was stolen, Vander Yacht said.

Police are still investigating Juvonen to see if he is connected with any other crimes in the area.

Juvonen admitted to being a drug addict, and he trades or sells the items to obtain drugs, Vander Yacht said.

Police are asking anyone who may have additional information on thefts in the area, even if they were unreported, to call Detective Gina Crosswhite at 360-778-8835.

Reach James Kozanitis at 360-715-2249 or james.kozanitis@bellinghamherald.com.

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