Our Voice: We're grateful for all who share their many talents

December 5, 2013 

Patrick Murphy Tricycle

November 28, 2013 - Patrick Murphy can now ride a tricycle in the driveway of his Kennewick home with a little help from his mother, Suzie Murphy, to power the pedals. The youngster is making great strides in recovering from brain surgery in 2011.

BOB BRAWDY — Tri-City Herald

There's always a lot going on in this community, but this time of year brings an abundance of offerings.

Today we're grateful for the people who share their talents, whether they encompass theater, music, faith or leadership.

December seems to be the showcase month.

Holiday happenings

As a community we are fortunate to have many Christmas programs and activities to enjoy this time of year. Nativity displays and the lighted boat parade and concerts and plays and ... the list seems as long as Santa's naughty and nice lists combined.

Some events are put on by churches or neighborhoods or musical groups or whole communities.

There are simply too many events to mention each one individually in this column.

However, if you're planning your weekend or the rest of the month, you can see many of the activities online at calendar.tricityherald.com. (You can also add your activity to the list free of charge.)

Many of the events are free or the sponsors are donating the admission fees to help a charity.

It's a great season to be in the Mid-Columbia.

Family's prayers

Sometimes people are gravely ill and they recover. Sometimes the outcome is different. Both experiences test their loved ones' mettle and give opportunities for their communities to rally around them.

Patrick Murphy's family knows all too well what it's like to hope against the odds -- and to feel other people's love and support and prayers.

Murphy had part of his brain removed when he was just under a year old. Now, almost three years later, his family has much to be grateful for, including his recovery and miraculous healing.

This family's story inspires us partly because of their faith, but mostly because of their attitude. Life has ups and downs. It's guaranteed we will all have disappointments, some of them will be extreme.

Oh that we all can face those trials with the memory of good times and the hope of a better day.

Leggett's legacy

Bill Leggett can feel good about his efforts to help kids and improve learning. His educational journey took him from being a high school dropout to a teacher, a principal and -- for the last 17 years -- a school board member.

Leggett has worked with kids across the nation but his last 30-plus years have been in Pasco. He's well respected in our community and has worked hard to earned this reputation.

We've seen him in action over the years. We admire his devotion to the Pasco schools and families.

All things -- good and bad -- come to an end. To often that end is smattered with regrets. Leggett has none of those.

He says he has done everything he wanted to do. Good for him. Good for us. Thank you, Bill, and good luck on where your path leads to next.

Bellingham Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service